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Council Student Candidate Bios
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Lisa Beebe is a Ph.D. candidate in cultural musicology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her dissertation research frames a history of the dan Bau Vietnamese monochord, focusing on the instruments role in contemporary cultural politics in Vietnam, as well as in the California diaspora. Lisa is currently the Student Concerns Representative for the Northern California Chapter for the Society for Ethnomusicology. She has presented her work at the Society’s Annual Meeting (2014) and at local meetings of the Northern California Chapter (2014, 2016). This spring, she will share research from her most recent fieldwork in Vietnam as part of a graduate student workshop hosted by the Centre for Southeast Asia Research at the University of British Columbia. Along with dan Bau studies, Lisa also plays viola da gamba and crumhorn in the Bay Area ensemble Apostasy. She has a B.A. in music from Hiram College (Ohio) and an M.A. in music history from the University of Washington.

Grace Osborne is a rising 4th year doctoral student in NYU’s FAS music department. Currently, she is working on her dissertation, which is oriented around sound and vibrational healing practitioners, modalities, and spaces. Her interests include sound art, listening, women in music, and spirituality. At past SEM Annual Meetings, Grace has volunteered in a variety of capacities and is actively committed to a number of groups, including the Sound Studies SIG, the Gender and Sexualities Taskforce, and the Section on the Status of Women. Her service interests include fostering mentorship, inclusivity, funding opportunities for research, and diversity.

Douglas Dowling Peach is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology at Indiana University (Bloomington). His research critically engages issues of cultural heritage, tourism, race, religion, memory, and social trauma within the African Diaspora in the United States, particularly among Gullah Geechee musicians in coastal South Carolina. This research is inspired by his former position as the South Carolina Folklife and Traditional Arts Program Director at McKissick Museum (University of South Carolina) and the South Carolina Arts Commission. At the chapter level, he is an active member of the Society for Ethnomusicology’s Southeast and Caribbean Chapter (SEM-SEC), has presented original research at SEM-SEC’s 2015 and 2016 meetings, and was asked to serve as a consultant for SEM-SEC’s 2017 conference. Nationally, Douglas has served as a graduate student volunteer for the Dance, Movement, and Gesture Section at the SEM 2013 Annual Meeting, has actively participated in meetings of the Applied Ethnomusicology Section, and has been an attendee at SEM Annual Meetings since 2008.

Daniel Akira Stadnicki is a Ph.D. Candidate in Ethnomusicology and Popular/World Music Instructor at the University of Alberta, Canada. His dissertation project, supported by a Vanier Graduate Scholarship, explores the music of Iranian Baha'is in the Canadian diaspora. Daniel has presented papers and performed lecture/demonstrations at major conferences across North America and Europe, specializing in the areas of music and religion (Baha'i Faith; African American Pentecostalism); the world music industry; social semiotics; music and protest; the Iranian diaspora; collaborative ethnography; popular and folk music pedagogy; and the cultural histories of the drum kit. In addition to his scholarly work, Daniel is a professional drummer and percussionist, working primarily in Canada’s thriving roots/folk and world music scenes. As an SEM member, Daniel has served on the Lise Waxer Prize Committee in the Popular Music Section (2015-2016). He has presented at two Annual Meetings (2014; 2015), including the “Music and Labor” pre-conference symposium (2014), as well as the 2014 Southern Plains Chapter Meeting at UT Austin.

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